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Boy Scout Troop 583
(Kenosha, Wisconsin)
 
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http://troop583kenosha.ScoutLander.com

  
 

Boy Scout Troop 583, Kenosha, WI



Troop 583 is chartered with:
Unity Lodge No 367 F & AM
4320 Washington Rd
Kenosha, WI 53141
We meet Wednesday from 6:30PM to 8:00PM
The 1st Wednesday of the month the Senior Patrol Leader (SPL) has a Patrol Leaders Conference (PLC)
On the 2nd and 4th Wednesday of the month the Troop has a meeting
On the 3rd Wednesday of the month the Patrols meet.
Once a quarter (March/June/September/December) The troop has a Court of Honor and recognizes the accomplishments of the Scouts for the previous quarter.

The Boy Scout program is for the Scouts and is as successful and rewarding as each Scout, Scouter (adult leader), and parent make it.  Our mission as leaders of Troop 583 is to serve the boys by instilling values, preparing them to make ethical choices over their lifetime and to enable them to achieve their full potential.  It is our hope to develop an awareness of self-reliance, to improve individual and group skills, and to increase the abilities and knowledge of the Scout, particularly those of the outdoors and nature.  We intend to accomplish this by working toward the three aims of scouting, which are:

1)      Foster Citizenship.

2)      To build moral Strength and Character.

3)      Development of Physical, Mental, and Emotional Fitness.

Our values are based upon the Scout Oath and Law and reinforced through our involvement with community service projects and other scout outings such as camping, rock climbing and repelling, patrol and troop meetings, etc.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KKxXx-6rOVg

Why do Scouts wear a Uniform?


Scouting's founder, Lord Baden Powell realized long ago, that when people look the same (uniform), they not only show they are members of an organization, but being dressed the same  ERASES all trace of "class" or "wealth" or "social status".  

In Scouting, all are equal and treat each other with respect.  In doing so, we learn to look past class, income, race, religion, nationality, and social status.

Despite the attacks from some of Scouting's detractors, there has never been a program so OPEN and SUPPORTIVE of diversity as Scouting.

Considering this was taken into account in 1907,  Lord Baden Powell was clearly a man ahead of his time.


http://bsauniforms.org/
 

BSA Mission Statement

It is the mission of the Boy Scouts of America to serve others by helping to instill values in young people and to prepare them to make ethical choices during their lifetime in achieving their full potential.  The values we strive to instill are based on those found in the Scout Oath and Scout Law

 

The Scout Oath or Promise

On my honor

I will do my best

To do my duty to God and my Country and

To obey the Scout Law,

To help other people at all times,

To keep myself physically strong,

Mentally awake, and morally straight

 

 

The Scout Law

A Scout is: Trustworthy, Loyal, Helpful, Friendly, Courteous, Kind, Obedient,

Cheerful, Thrifty, Brave, Clean and Reverent

 

 


The Scout Motto

“Be Prepared”

 

 


The Scout Slogan

“Do a Good Turn Daily”

 

 


The Outdoor Code

As an American, I will do my best to

Be clean in my outdoor manners,

Be careful with fire,

Be considerate in the outdoors, and

Be conservation-minded

What is the ONE bit of advice for a Scout?


READ THE BOOK !

The Boy Scout Handbook does an EXCELLENT job explaining the BSA Program. 

It also provides valuable skill instruction and has the potential to IGNITE dreams of adventure, exploration, and fun for boys of all backgrounds and abilities.... all of which are POSSIBLE in this troop! 

"I'm bored" are the 2 words NO Scout has a right to say, as we are determined to help bring all their ideas into reality.

Spend time with your son each night (especially if he is new to Scouting).   Read the book with him.  Quiz him on a skill, or "challenge" him to a knot tying contest.  Ask him how he sees himself living up to the Scout Law.

Don't let Scouting be "90 minutes" 2 X a month, but a regular and routine part of every day.

http://www.bsahandbook.org/ 

What do you mean by "Boy Led"?


A Boy Scout troop leads itself.   Adults are present to guide and ensure safety & compliance exists, but it is the YOUTH who make key decisions.

The Scouting program using The Patrol Method means the Troop members ELECT their own leaders; individual Patrol Leaders and a Senior Patrol Leader (SPL) who takes on "ownership" and hold the actual leadership position within the Troop.  The SPL appoints an assistant scout (Assistant Senior Patrol Leader - ASPL) and various other leadership positions.

While serving as Senior Leaders, the SPL and ASPL cease to be members of their respective patrols and function as peers with the adult leadership. The SPL and ASP execute Program decisions, lead the meetings, plan agendas, pick camping destinations, and LEAD BY EXAMPLE when executing the agenda that the boys themselves created and agreed to follow.

Patrol Leaders are responsible for the well being and actions of their individual patrol and will REPRESENT their patrol in the Patrol Leaders Council (PLC).

At the PLC meeting (chaired by the SPL and monitored by the Scoutmaster or Assistant Scoutmaster), Patrol Leaders plan future trips and troop meetings.  Through a model of Representative Government, they CHOOSE the trips and activities THEY want to do, and appoint other scouts to serve as skill instructors, or lead games or other activities.  Adult leadership keeps them on track with suggestions and advice, but the decisions are ultimately left to THE BOYS.

Once the future meetings/camping trips are planned, the SPL and Scoutmaster present the PLC's plans to the Troop Committee for review. The agenda is checked for issues such as necessary fund raising, unique equipment/skills, camp ground reservations, and is given an over-all inspection to confirm that trips are aligned with the purpose of the Scouting Program.   If the plans are approved, and the weekly meetings are lead by the boys (as designed) unless the skill instruction needed is currently beyond the skill set of the Scouts, or relates to merit badge requirements, then adults will render assistance.

ADULTS are a RESOURCE for guidance and ensuring that things are done the "BSA way" for safety, youth development and general direction setting.

"Boy Leadership" really means the Troop is doing the things the BOYS THEMSELVES want to do, and in doing so, will develop the leadership, communication, problem resolution, and organizational skills that underscore why Scouts excel in all other areas of their lives.

What is the purpose of a "patrol"?


A significant part of the Scouting experience is to get plenty of  HANDS ON activity.  From knot tying, to cooking on a fire and stove, to learning how to use a pocket knife or axe...   Scouts "DO".

In order to make sure everyone gets a chance to DO, boys are divided into smaller groups within the Troop so that everyone gets ample opportunity to participate.  This is part of what the BSA calls, "The Patrol Method".

Within a patrol-sized group, boys do not get "lost among the crowd" or feel as though their opinions (and votes) don't matter. Each plays a critical and important role in the Patrol's success.

The definition of the "Patrol Method" from the National Council's website...

Patrols are the building blocks of a Boy Scout troop. A patrol is a small group of boys who are similar in age, development, and interests. Working together as a team, patrol members share the responsibility for the patrol's success. They gain confidence by serving in positions of patrol leadership. All patrol members enjoy the friendship, sense of belonging, and achievements of the patrol and of each of its members.

Wouldn't it "run smoother" with adults in charge?


Yup... it probably would.  But why would we want that?

This is BOY SCOUTS... not "fathers getting away for the weekend" Scouts... nor is it "WEBELOS 3" where adults are in the leadership role as in the Cub Scout program.

This is where boys LEARN and DEVELOP their leadership skills so they can become capable young men.   We DON'T EXPECT them to be the most efficient and organized leaders (and neither should you). 

This is their learning ground.  Here is where we want the "mistakes" to happen, so they can learn from them.   This is how we TEACH leadership skills instead of getting adults to "step in" because we could be "more efficient".

Remember... the program is NOT DESIGNED to run perfectly.

They may elect their "best friend" instead of the "most qualified"... and they will experience the consequences of casting a "careless vote".  They may elect the Class Clown instead of the Class President... and NEED to "suffer" through a few months of a weaker or chaotic Program.

Remember, NOTHING happens here by accident.  Trust us. Trust the 100 year old program. Have faith.   Keep your boy coming ESPECIALLY if he comes home with a few "complaints" on how things are being done.  Ask him what he would do differently or what he did to try to correct what appears to be a "screwed up" situtation.  HERE is where the Program really shows its value.

NOW you know...  "bigger things" are happening here than meets the eye.    :-)

The difference between Rank & Merit Badges?


Rank is an interesting word choice, clearly derived from Scouting's origin as a program modeled after a military structure.

Those holding a "higher rank" do not order around those of "lower rank".   In Scouting, the term "rank" is a PERSONAL measure of his progress along the "Trail to Eagle"... or more appropriately thought of as his "trail to manhood".

When a boy joins Scouting, his first POSITION is one of "Scout". 

He then works on the first 3 RANKS; Tenderfoot, 2nd Class, and 1st Class.    Within the requirements of these ranks, a Scout learns the SAFETY aspects of Scouting; basic first aid, how to choose a safe camp spot, how to properly dress for an outing, how to find his way with map/compass, what to do if he gets lost, etc...

Now a demonstrated "safe" Scout... he is ready for his next period of personal development, which is LEADERSHIP.  In the pursuit of Star, Life, and Eagle, a youth is learning (and then mastering) the skills of leadership.  By holding leadership positions within the troop, he learns to lead, instruct, and inspire others.  He learns to "give back" to others, and also learns his emerging place in Society as a citizen.


There are 121 various Merit Badges available (only 21 needed for Eagle).   To ensure that the Scouts are getting a taste of the opportunities available, the higher badges of rank require a set number of merit badges be completed (including some designated as "Eagle required").

Merit Badges offer exposure to a diverse background of interests, adventures, and opportunities that Scouts may never experience IF NOT for the Scouting program (Aviation, Scuba, Reptile study, shooting sports, etc).    It is not uncommon that exposure to a topic via the Merit Badge Program leads to life-long hobbies and career choices, as well as "needed skills" like Home Repair, Auto Mechanics, and Public Speaking.

There is no limit on the number of Merit Badges a youth may earn.

What badges are "Eagle Required" ?



There are a total of 21 Merit Badges required for the rank of Eagle.

12 of these badges are Eagle Required "White Bands"  (merit badges with white/silver border stitching around the edges).

The remaining 9 (or more if you choose) may be any badges from among the remaining 109 non-Eagle required "Green Band" merit badges (badges with green stitching around the border).

While there are 15 possible Eagle Merit Badges, there are some that are "optional".  Refer to the picture to clearly understand which badges qualify for Eagle, and which ones do not.   Earning MORE THAN ONE of the optional badges will NOT afford you the choice to NOT earn other required badges, but "extra" Eagle badges can be counted towards the mandatory total of 21.